Course Descriptions

E210 ENGLISH 10 (H)-WORLD LITERATURE SEMINAR 10-12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: English 9)
This course employs a thematic approach to the study of literature. The development of the hero in literature is traced. Works are read in their entirety and typically include The Odyssey, Gawain and the Green Knight, Oedipus, the King, and Hamlet. Students alternate writing literary analysis papers with giving oral reports. Students are also expected to write regularly in literature logs and to participate daily in class discussion. Vocabulary is presented weekly with cumulative review tests following every five lists. SAT testing elements are emphasized. The mechanics of writing are presented through a prescriptive approach in relation to specific writing tasks. Students are expected to generate their own topics and to write with absolute voice and style. Assignments may include a persuasive essay, classification, cause and effect, and definition.

E220 ENGLISH 10 (CP) 10-12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: English 9)
This course is designed to meet the needs of students who will enter college or other post-secondary education after high school. The course includes a survey of American literature, vocabulary development, spelling, a review of punctuation, informative oral presentation, and correction of writing problems. Writing assignments will include journal entries, essay answers, diary entries of a fictional character, a memoir, and a self-assessment paper. This course is a survey of American literature. Authors read include Irving, Poe, Bryant, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Porter, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Salinger, Updike, Frost, Whitman, and Cummings. Intensive independent reading from selected works including novels is required, as well as several short analysis papers. It is recommended that students have passed English 9 CP with an average of 75 or above and that they are able to read and comprehend at grade level.

E230 APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 10 10-12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: Applied Communications 9)
The Applied Communications course for tenth grade is designed to meet the needs of students interested in entering the workforce, technical school, or a two-year college following high school graduation. This course will include components concerned with communication in the workplace, vocabulary, spelling, American literature, writing and usage. Students will read short stories, plays, and novels by a variety of authors such as Poe, Jackson, Rose, Wilder, Hemingway, Hawthorne, and Frost. Writing assignments will include a character sketch, essay answers, business letters, and a memoir. The course will deal with problems in usage and mechanics such as punctuation, word agreement, recognizing correct sentences, and words often confused.

E300 AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 11 6/6 1.00

Honors students may choose to take this course as their English credit for junior year. It is a college level course that offers the student the opportunity to specialize in language and composition and to become a more critical reader. Successful completion of this course and the AP examination may lead to college credit.

E301 ENGLISH 11 COMPOSITION (H) 11 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: English 10)
This course is devoted to planning, drafting, revising, and editing as critical components of the writing process. Contemporary authors and essayists, including Ray Bradbury, George Orwell, Joan Didion, John Updike, Garrison, Keillor, Amy Tan, and Thomas Wolfe are studied. Writing tasks include persuasion, definition, a book review, narration, and comparison/contrast. Students also write for publication. Sophisticated expression is the goal. A portfolio is required.

E320 ENGLISH 11 (CP) 11 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: English 10)
This course approaches the study of World Literature through a chronological survey. Major works read typically include the Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, Oedipus, the King, Hamlet, Dante’s Inferno, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and A Doll’s House. The course also emphasizes oral and written analysis of literature. The core writing assignments are a written response to an oral or visual aesthetic, a persuasive paper on a contemporary issue, informative writing, and a book review. Literary analysis papers are also required.

E330 APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 11 11 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: Applied Communications 10)
This course represents the third level of the Applied Communications curriculum, designed to prepare students to enter a vocational school, community college, or the workplace directly from high school. Literature includes units on the short story, poetry, Oedipus, the King, Hamlet, and A Doll’s House. Emphasis is placed upon appreciation and understanding rather than on formal analysis.

E400 AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION 12 6/6 1.00

Honors students may choose to take this course as their English credit for senior year. It is a college level course that stresses critical reading and extensive literary analysis. Successful completion of this course and the AP examination may lead to college credit.

E401 ENGLISH 12 LITERATURE (H) 11 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: English 11)
This course stresses critical reading and literary analysis. Works such as Macbeth, Madam Bovary, As I Lay Dying and Dante’s Inferno and other works of comparable literary value will be read. Short stories by John Cheever and James Joyce will be studied, as well as poets Keats, Eliot, and Donne. Writing assignments will include book reviews, analysis papers, research papers, and journal entries. Class work will be devoted to discussing the literary works, commenting and peer editing of student writing, and striving to improve critical abilities and writing skills.

E430 APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 12 12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: Applied Communications 11)
This course represents the culmination of the Applied Communications curriculum, designed to prepare students to enter a vocational school, community college, four-year college, or the workplace including the military. Emphasis is placed upon the skills needed to function in an increasingly complex world. Students will perform various research tasks, read and comprehend a variety of texts, solve problems, write for a variety of purposes, and analyze and make critical judgments. Literature studied typically includes Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, Macbeth, another short novel, and independent readings. Short stories and poetry are also read. A reader response journal and vocabulary notebook are required.

Senior CP English: choose one semester of literature, one semester of composition:


E420 BRITISH LITERATURE (CP) (s) 12 6/6 0.50

(Prerequisite: English 11)
This semester course is a survey of major British authors. Works studied include Beowulf, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, the legends of King Arthur, Wordsworth, Keats, Bronte, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, and Eliot. This course emphasizes oral and written analysis of literature. Several short papers are undertaken that require considerable research. Skills emphasized include reading critically and independently, understanding plot structure, using and understanding figurative language, identifying themes in literature, proofreading, and oral reporting.

E422 COMPOSITION (CP) (L) (s) 12 6/6 0.50

(Prerequisite: English 11)
This required CP semester course specializes in language and composition. Class work is devoted to language mastery and the critical components of the writing process: planning, drafting, revising and editing. Students enrolled in this course will be scheduled for writing lab. Core writing assignments include an extended persuasive essay, a definition, a narrative, a descriptive, and numerous journal entries. A portfolio will be developed throughout the semester. Critical reading of contemporary essayists including Orwell, Didion, Ray Bradbury, Maya Angelou, and Annie Dillard is undertaken.

E423 MODERN LITERATURE (CP) (s) 12 6/6 0.50

(Prerequisite: English 11)
This semester course focuses on relevant themes and styles in significant authors of the early twentieth century. Writers studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Camus, Sartre, Joyce, and Miller. The course also emphasizes oral and written analysis. Several short analysis papers are undertaken. Skills emphasized include critical and independent reading, understanding plot structure, using and understanding figurative language, identifying themes in literature, and identifying various critical approaches.

E424 MYTH AND RITUAL IN LITERATURE (s) 12 6/6 0.50

(World Literature)
(Prerequisite: English 11)
This course will provide an examination of the universal themes and ideas of mankind. It will take you on a journey into an exciting and mysterious world where you can expect to encounter gods, heroes, monsters, exotic countries, and amazing adventures. Instead of concentrating on the differences that separate cultures across the globe, it examines the similarities and the universal themes of the human experience. It will examine mythological stories from around the world. This course emphasizes oral and written analysis of literature. Several short papers are undertaken that require considerable research. Skills emphasized include reading critically and independently, understanding plot structure, using and understanding figurative language, identifying themes in literature, proofreading, and oral reporting.

E245, E345, E445 ENGLISH INDIVIDUALIZED

10 10 6/6 1.00
11 11 6/6 1.00
12 12 6/6 1.00
(Placement is based on recommendation by the English department, Reading Specialists, or the Guidance department, subject to administrative approval)
This program sequence delivers individually designed instruction in language arts for students whose needs cannot be met in other English classes. Students receive one credit in English towards graduation upon successful completion of each course.

E140, E141 READING EDGE

9 6/6 1.00
9 6/6 0.50
This program is designed for students who have been identified as needing additional instruction and guided practice with reading and language arts.  Students who score below the proficient level on the state reading assessment and who did not reach proficiency after completing Reading Edge 8 will be assigned to Reading Edge 9.  Placement of new students to the district will be determined by the state assessment or scores from the previous school (PSSA or other state assessment).  If a student does not have a state assessment score, a pre-test will be given to determine eligibility.  Students will be placed in a full year of Edge if hey have scored below basic on the PSSA in eighth grade.  In the event that all sections become filled, additional criteria will be implemented to determine eligibility.

The purpose of the course is to give students an edge in their reading performance to help them meet Pennsylvania Academic Standards in reading and writing.  Instruction will target reading comprehension and writing.  Students will also learn strategies to improve their academic performance in all subject areas.

Reading/Writing workshops are recommended for students in need of remediation:


E244 READING/WRITING WORKSHOP (REM) 10 6/6 1.00

This course will focus on reading and writing, much of which will be done in a workshop atmosphere, with each student progressing at his/her own pace. Selections will be chosen by the students themselves, subject to teacher approval. Independent work which develops increased proficiency in reading and writing is drawn directly from students' self-selected literature. tudents will respond to readings by free writing and process writing, including brainstorming, writing rough drafts, peer review, editing, and completing final drafts. In addition, mini-lessons in grammar and writing styles will be presented. Portfolios will be developed and contain major assignments which will demonstrate the progress each student has made throughout the year.

E340 READING/WRITING WORKSHOP 2 (REM) 11-12 6/6 1.00

This course focuses on the improvement of the student’s reading and writing skills through the use of a workshop atmosphere. Critical reading ability is developed. Students are encouraged to choose their own reading and writing topics following a guided choice of materials. Students record their responses to their reading in a reading log. Writing assignments are developed as a result of their reading. Grammar, spelling, and vocabulary are taught in the context of individual writing and reading conferences with the students. Students’ best work is collected and evaluated through the use of writing portfolios.

English Electives: these courses are offered in addition to the district required english courses.


E315 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY(H)11-12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: Honors application process)
This course presents a chronological overview of the major trends in philosophic thought from Ancient Greece through the 20th century. Major emphasis is placed on government, ethics, and aesthetics. Particular philosophers studied include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Mill, Rousseau and Nietzsche. This is an honors level course with a considerable amount of reading and writing expected.

E355 JOURNALISM 10-11 6/6 1.00

Journalism is a course designed for a student who is interested in all aspects of the publications industry. In this course, we will familiarize the student with the role of the journalist in today’s society. Students will discuss the legal aspects of publication. They will develop their interviewing, pre-writing, revising, and copy editing skills. Students will learn how to write effective headlines, cutlines, captions, and leads. They will write feature, news, opinion, and sports stories. Layout techniques and basic graphic design, using Quark Express, will be taught. While the primary focus of the course for the students is learning the fundamentals, they will be expected to participate in the creation of the newspaper, the Mountaineer. They will produce several portfolios.

E415 ADVANCED JOURNALISM- NEWSPAPER (H) 11-12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisites):
a. Journalism and Honors application process
b. for an incoming senior, permission from the instructor)
Advanced Journalism is a course designed for the student who has successfully completed Journalism. The main focus of the students is the creation of the award-winning newspaper, the Mountaineer. This course requires a great deal of initiative on the student's part. The classroom environment will usually not be teacher-centered. Students will be expected to work creatively and independently on a regular basis, contributing to the creation of a high quality newspaper. Oral communication is a very important aspect of this course. Students will refine communication skills through interviewing other students, teachers, and other school staff, as well as members of the greater Stroudsburg community. Students will also refine their writing skills through the writing of feature, news, opinion, and sports articles for both peer and teacher evaluation and for publication standards set by professionals and organizations such as the Pennsylvania School Press Association. Students will be taught advanced layout and design techniques on the computer, and will gain proficiency using Quark Express. They will produce several portfolios.

E416 ADVANCED JOURNALISM - YEARBOOK (H) 12 6/6 1.00

(Prerequisite: Journalism or permission of the instructor and Honors application process)
Students will be taught advanced layout and design techniques for all types of publications. They will also receive hands on training using Adobe with In Design page layout program to type copy, headlines and to create graphics. This course will also include in-depth discussions on the meaning of libel and its implications in the areas of publication.

E354 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (s) 10-12 6/6 0.50

This semester course will provide students with an introduction to film as a communication medium. Students will learn to “read” the language of film so they may better appreciate how movies impact their audiences and relate to other forms of communication. Students will study cinematography, mis en scene, movement, editing, and sound, among other elements. They will also explore the literary and dramatic aspects of film, including symbolism.

In class, students will analyze clips primarily from classic films, including silent and black and white. Several classics will be viewed in their entirety. Students will also be required to watch several films outside of class. To help students better understand film, they will read extensively from texts and literature about the medium.

Several written response papers will be required. Students will also complete a significant research project. Sophisticated oral and written analysis of film will be required, as well as a critical awareness of images and how they influence the viewer.

E356 CREATIVE WRITING (s) 10-12 6/6 0.50

In this course, students will explore poetry and short fiction. In addition to examining the works of well-known writers, they will experiment with various exploratory exercises. Students will keep writing journals, and should expect to write daily. The class will often operate as a reading/writing workshop; students will be expected to share their work on a regular basis in writing groups and through oral presentations. Emphasis will also be on individual achievement and progress. The final portion of the semester will be devoted to students working on individual projects, in poetry, fiction, or a genre that meets the instructor's approval. Students will submit samples of their writing for publication. They will produce a portfolio of their favorite works.

E357 PUBLIC SPEAKING, RHETORIC AND DEBATE(s) 10-12 6/6 0.50

This course is designed for the student who wishes to improve his/her oral communication skills. The student will be given practical experience in many different forms of public speaking such as informal discussion, extemporaneous and impromptu speaking, and informative, persuasive and demonstrative presentations. Additionally, students will participate in a debate. Also emphasized will be nonverbal communication and the ethical issues of public communication. Speeches are required and students should expect to be videotaped for class instruction.

E540, E541 ACADEMIC STRATEGIES

10-12 6/6 0.50
10-12 6/6 1.00
( Placement into the program is based on recommendation by the English department, Reading Specialists, or the Guidance department.)
This program is available to students who have been identified as needing additional instruction and practice with basic reading, language arts skills, and study skills. Development of improved study strategies is stressed. When necessary, students receive help with other content material and assignments. This program is individualized to meet the needs of the student and it is an elective course that does not count as original English credit.

E358 DRAMA 1 (s) 10-12 6/6 0.50

In this elective course, students will not just read and discuss drama, but become a part of the drama itself. All aspects of this genre will be discussed and explored, and many opportunities for practical experiences will be offered. Specific plays encountered include The Glass Menagerie, The Miracle Worker, Brighton Beach Memoirs, Waiting for Godot, Rhinoceros, and Importance of Being Earnest. Writing assignments include journaling and two short writing assignments. A research project and a set or costume design project is also required. Emphasis is placed upon performance and memorization of lines is required.

E359 DRAMA 2 (s) 10-12 6/6 0.50

(Prerequisite: Drama 1)
This elective course will immerse students into the production aspects of the theater. It presents a detailed overview of major trends in directing, casting, auditioning, producing, acting, and publicizing, as well as creating costumes, sets, lighting, and sound designs for the theater. Students will be taught techniques necessary to complete a culminating project where they will select a one act play and go through all the steps involved in directing and producing their vision.

The English as a Second Language (ESL) Program is offered to any student whose primary language is something other than English. The primary objective of the ESL Program is to promote the acceleration of English language proficiency.

E81E ENGLISH 1 ESL 9-12 6/6 1.00

Students engage in listening, speaking, reading, and writing English through an integrated language arts curriculum using Level 1 core curriculum materials for English Language Acquisition (ELA), literature, and other supplemental materials. Building both on their prior knowledge and on newly introduced material, they prepare to enter academic content classes. They become familiar with the culture and structure of an American high school and the community. Placement is made following assessment by the ESL teacher. This course may be used as one English credit. This course may be repeated.

E82E ENGLISH 2 ESL 9-12 6/6 1.00

Students continue to engage in listening, speaking, reading, and writing English using Level 2 core curriculum materials for ELA, literature, and other supplemental materials. Using an integrated approach to language study, students increase their vocabulary and understanding of the structure of English. Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) are developed and groundwork is laid for Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP). Placement in this course is made following assessment by the ESL teacher. This course may be used as one English credit. This course may be repeated.

E83E ENGLISH 3 ESL 9-12 6/6 1.00

Students continue to engage in listening, speaking, reading, and writing English using Level 3 core curriculum materials for ELA, literature, and other supplemental materials. Using an integrated approach to language study, students practice their listening and speaking skills and study the structure of the English language. BICS are exercised and instruction in CALPS is expanded. Students may be recommended for exit from the ESL program after meeting established criteria at the end of this course. This course may be used as one English credit. This course may be repeated.

E84E ESL READING/WRITING WORKSHOP 10-12 6/6 1.00

This multi-level course is intended to integrate students of different levels of English language proficiency in order to prepare for the PSSA. Writing portfolios are created to show proficiency in focus, content development, organization and style. Particular attention is given to grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation. Reading selections are modeled after state tests and are assessed through similar comprehension, interpretation, and analysis questions. Practice with multiple choice and open-ended items is included. Individualized instruction in vocabulary development is given at each student’s own level. This class is recommended for ESL levels 2, 3, and 4 students.

H81L SOCIAL STUDIES ESL 9-12 6/6 1.00

Developmental listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities are integrated with the thematic material being addressed for beginning level 1 students. The whole language materials and methods provide an environment conducive to acquiring language and internalizing the concepts contained in the themes. The material delivered is grade level appropriate, however materials used are at the lowest reading levels available. Multimedia materials are also utilized for cultural information as well as for language and concept development. This course may be used as one Social Studies credit. This course may be repeated.

N81L SCIENCE ESL 9-12 6/6 1.00

Developmental listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities are integrated with the thematic material being addressed for beginning level 1 students. The whole language materials and methods provide an environment conducive to acquiring language and internalizing the concepts contained in the themes. The material delivered is grade level appropriate, however materials used are at the lowest reading levels available. Multimedia materials are also utilized for cultural information as well as for language and concept development. This course may be used as one Science credit. This course may be repeated.

E81L ACADEMIC STRATEGIES ESL 9 6/6 1.00

The program is available to ESL students who have been identified as needing additional instruction and practice with basic reading, language arts skills and study skills. Development of improved study strategies is stressed. Students receive help with content material and assignments. This program is individualized to meet the needs of the student. It is an elective course that does not count as an original English credit.